Scum of the Earth (1974 VHS)


 Scum of the Earth (1974)
aka
Poor White Trash Part II


Helen Fraser (Norma Moore), a pretty city girl on vacation with her hubby Paul, flees into the Texas backwoods after finding her spouse dead (having lost an argument with the business end of an axe!). Panic-stricken, she runs into redneck Odis Pickett, who takes her back to his cabin to meet the family: pregnant wife Emmy, daughter Sarah and idiot son Bo. But rather than call for help, Odis proceeds to subject Helen to a night of drunken abuse, culminating in rape.

And all the while, a murderer lurks in the woods outside, waiting to kill again.

Scum Of The Earth (AKA Poor White Trash part 2), by director S. F. Brownrigg, may not feature the highest of production values, and might be a mite talky for many people, but with a script that delivers some of the funniest hillbilly dialogue in the history of cinema (this one packs in every clich├ęd redneck saying in the book), great characters (think the Clampetts, only not so clever), and a smidgen of incest, rape and murder, it's difficult to resist the film's sleazy exploitation charms. (IMDB  BA_Harrison)





















The House (2007 Thailand)

 The House (2007 Thailand)
aka Baan phii sing 


This is inspired by a true story of three horrible murders that happened to three women in years past. Chalinee, a young reporter, is curious as to the truth behind the three mysterious cases, so she starts searching for more information. Finally, she discovers the house where three women were killed by their lovers. But when she takes her final steps into the cursed house, she finds something more frightening than she ever imagined waiting for her. (IMDB smmorr240) V&D





















Bury Me an Angel (1972)


Bury Me an Angel (1972)

Directed by: Barbara Peeters


 Writer/director Barbara Peters was one of the few female filmmakers who specialized in entertainingly trashy low budget drive-in exploitation fare in the 70s and early 80s. Peters often worked for Roger Corman's B-flick studio New World Pictures. She made her feature debut as co-writer and co-director of the soft-core lesbian outing "The Dark Side of Tomorrow." Barbara followed this movie with the gritty distaff biker item "Bury Me an Angel," the amusingly silly comedy "Summer School Teachers," and the enjoyably inane "Starhops." Peters achieved her greatest notoriety with the wonderfully nasty horror creature feature winner "Humanoids from the Deep."
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Tautly directed biker film, told from the woman’s point of view. The heroine sets out on the road to avenge her brother’s murder, toting a shotgun and meaning business.
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You can complain all you want about low budget production values, but BURY ME AN ANGEL is a lot better than most biker pictures of the age, telling a "revenge-on-the-go" story that satisfies. Best of all, it defines both revenge and attitude at the same time! This is as solid as it gets with writing a feminist statement into an exploitation movie that doesn't require a single damsel going under a lot of painful distress. Many drive-in movies have copied off this tiring idea numerous times before (like the women-in-prison idea), so this movie was obviously going into a new direction. The key word is revenge, and it defines exactly what this movie is about, not withstanding the pressure of most filmmakers who still haven't learned how to make good exploitation. (IMDB  Jason C. Atwood)